Are you thinking of starting up an online subscription business? Or does your website accept payment on a regular basis as part of a subscription service? 

Online subscription-based services are rapidly growing in popularity, with streaming services, media outlets, and editing software companies leading the way. 

Before you start your business, though, you need the right legal documents in place. One of the key legal documents you’ll need is a set of Online Subscription Terms and Conditions

It’s a good idea to have these terms and conditions in place because the way people use your website is often out of your control. Unlike ordinary Website Terms and Conditions, if you’re running a subscription service, there are certain provisions in your terms and conditions that must be strongly emphasised to ensure you’re protected. 

What Should Be Included In The Terms & Conditions For My Online Subscription Service?

Generally, the terms and conditions for your online subscription service should address important matters such as:

  • User conduct
  • Your right to terminate the customer’s account
  • Use of intellectual property
  • Liability
  • Warranties
  • Non-refundable fees
  • Payment terms
  • Restrictions on use 
  • What happens when the subscription is terminated

Need Help?

At Sprintlaw, we have expertise in drafting Online Subscription Terms and Conditions, and have drafted them for a variety of subscription-based businesses.

Feel free to contact us at team@sprintlaw.com.au or on 1800 730 617 for a free, no-obligations chat about setting up your online subscription service and the legal documents you’ll need.

About Sprintlaw

Sprintlaw is a new type of law firm that operates completely online and on a fixed-fee basis. We’re on a mission to make quality legal services faster, simpler and more affordable for small business owners and entrepreneurs.

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